Create A Safe Work Environment By Allowing Input From All Sides

Create A Safe Work Environment | Allegiance

Posted by Oct 16, 2017 @ 9:30 am

We will soon be in that time of the year when many workers will experience cold stress. During the winter, many people will experience hypothermia, especially if they work outdoors. When workplaces have the proper preparation, hypothermia injuries can be prevented.

One of the best things for an employer to do is to create an entire workplace attitude of safety. Everyone is responsible for having to create a safe environment and a positive attitude. However, it is important for companies to create safety protocols and make sure these protocols are constantly being reinforced.

Hypothermia can have a lasting impact, and it is important that everyone in your workplace knows the symptoms of hypothermia. The signs of hypothermia are as follows:

  • Confusion
  • Drowsiness
  • Shaking
  • Incoordination
  • Slurred speech

In order to prevent swelling in the person’s body part that is been affected, it is important that the specific body part is elevated. The person should also be placed in an area that is warm. The clothing should be removed and a cloth or bandage should be applied to the area. Do not wait to call 911 for medical treatment; medical care will be needed as soon as possible.

Staff members should be included in the creation of the safety plan. When staff members are included in your safety plan, this will not only create an entire safety culture, but this will also encourage everyone to share their opinions about what things can be done to improve the safety plan. The ideas that can be shared will not only have to be for the winter safety plan, but for the entire year.

When everyone is allowed to have an input in the workplace safety plan, you will have a better chance of creating a safe work environment for the entire year.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

Will Using A Staffing Agency Be A Great Decision For Your Business?

Will Using A Staffing Agency Be A Great Decision? | Allegiance

Posted by Oct 9, 2017 @ 9:30 am

We will soon be in that time of year when businesses just like yours will be looking for as much help as they can get when it comes to extra help in the office or on a sales floor. As a business owner, you may be wondering if a staffing agency can actually help your business. When you are looking for one new employee or multiple new employees, you may be hesitant to let someone else do the hiring work for you.

Here are some of the reasons why we think you should let a third-party make the hiring decisions for you.

Save Time

When you think about the amount of time you will have to spend creating a job post, looking at all the resumes that are being submitted, scheduling interviews, and actually interviewing the job candidates, you will spend nearly three weeks in this whole process. When you let a third-party, like a staffing agency, handle these things for you, you will be able to focus on your business operations instead of being frustrated with the hiring process.

You Can Choose From The Best Of The Best

A staffing agency will use various networks that will include job candidates who are active and job candidates who may not be active. This means you will only receive the best candidates for your available job positions. Recruiters will look for the perfect job candidates who will fit all your business needs.

Your Candidates Will Meet Your Needs

Sometimes business owners hire people who do not always live up to the expectations that were set. You want the employee you hire to fully live up to the expectations. This is why we recommend using a staffing agency to hire your employees. Your new employees will be the perfect fit for the open position.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

Seasonal, Staffing, Employees, Hiring, Training

Seasonal Staffing Takes a Bite out of Excessive Turnover | Allegiance

Posted by Oct 2, 2017 @ 9:30 am

If your business has a difficult time holding on to employees, it is not always your company’s fault. Higher wages elsewhere and the demand for well-trained individuals can make your new-hires attractive to competitors. Unfortunately, you are left holding the bag when it comes to the expense associated with hiring and training. Make things easier on your budget with seasonal staffing.

When you are not sure if you can make a move from full-time, permanent employee search to a seasonal workforce, consider these advantages.

  • Students are excellent workers with lots of drive. They are young and want to earn as much money as they can in between classes and semesters. These workers may be the first ones to show up and the last ones to leave. For large projects with a time crunch, they can be excellent.
  • Start the recruitment process early and keep your project budget in check. A two-month head start is standard. You catch prospective workers at a time when they are thinking through their seasonal availability and can make a commitment to your company. By planning ahead, you also make it easier on your accountant to allocate the funds needed.
  • Test-drive potential full-time employees. There are always some individuals who will impress you with their work ethic, skills, and perfect fit with your company. After the seasonal employment opportunity is over, you might just have found an excellent employee to add to your rolls – without the high likelihood of losing the individual to a competitor.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

Job Interviews as Two-Way Assessments

Job Interviews as Two-Way Assessments | Allegiance

Posted by Sep 25, 2017 @ 9:30 am

Believe it or not it happens. A job interview can be like a marriage proposal. You can tell when the energy is bad. Your body screams at you, “Get out of here!”

Former Fortune 500 Senior HR VP. Liz Ryan gives examples in Forbes.

  • The interviewer tells a candidate is told right away, first thing in the interview, “I’m not even sure I’m going to hire anyone. The quality of candidates these days is so low!”
  • The candidate is asked to meet the interviewer in an out-of-office location and says, “I’m thinking of hiring you and firing Jenifer, my office manager.” When the candidate asks if Jenifer knows he is unhappy with her, the interviewer replies, “No, why tell her if I’m going to fire her?”
  • In a panel interview, five panelists fired questions so fast the candidate could hardly answer them. The panelists seemed to compete with each other to see who could ask the most. Finally, one of them asked, “how far in advance do you decide what you’re having for dinner?”
  • In the interview, the candidate ventures a question to find out more about the job. The interviewer declares, “I’m asking the questions here, not you!” The candidate stands, extends a hand for a handshake and says, “Thanks so much for your time today. I can see it’s not a good match. I’ll be going now and letting you get back to your busy schedule.”

There are times when leaving the interview is the best thing to do. You are not getting paid to waste time in a fruitless interview or when the interview looks like an excuse to abuse you. Some people love to interview just to feel powerful. Some people invite candidates from other companies as a kind of industrial espionage. You never really know if there is a real job that will come out of the interview. Many people whose gut tells them it’s not worth it, simply leave.

In the interview, the employer gets to find out about the candidate and the candidate gets to find out about the employer. If clear indications are that this is not the employer you want, the interview is over. A courteous departure is all you need. In fact, many employment counsellors suggest that job seekers conduct informational interviews, job interviews in reverse, meeting employers just to find out about them and their companies.

In the current hard-times business culture, many people have come to think of the employment interview as a rare privilege. It’s almost as if the candidate is in the position of a mendicant imploring the powerful for special dispensation. That attitude is dangerous.

One of the valuable things about the interview is that is an information exchange, in terms of both tangibles and intangibles about the people involved. It’s important to maintain the interactional part of the interview. The interview is to find out the suitability of a financial and service arrangement and if a long-term collaboration is possible. Just because one of you has the money and the applicant does not, does not deprive the applicant of parity. The interview is also about the company trying to convince the applicant to work for them. If they fail to impress you or they repel you, it’s not only acceptable to make a polite exit, it is highly recommended.

One candidate describes his experience this way:

“I  walked out on an interview before it began once. The interview was scheduled for 10 am….I showed up about 10 minutes early. I signed in…and waited and waited. Forty-five minutes later I got up and asked the receptionist…to let my interviewer know I was no longer interested, and left. Two hours later I got a rude call asking if I forgot the appointment. I laughed and hung up.”

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

Seasonal Staffing Best Practices – Part I

Seasonal Staffing Best Practices – Part I | Allegiance

Posted by Sep 18, 2017 @ 9:30 am

Seasonal staffing is a chronic headache for recruiters and HR professionals, but these problems can be alleviated and minimized through proper preparation, managed service providers and by following the advice below.

HR Preparation

It’s wise to approach seasonal staffing like full-time positions through preparing detailed job instructions. Some employers assume because it is short-term, they don’t need to invest in training, but the opposite can be true. In short-term hiring situations, it’s critical to set proper expectations because temporary staff must quickly learn to perform their duties well. Specific directions and descriptions will increase performance and reduce turnover rates.

Word-of-mouth Advertising

Placing ads online and in print media is no longer the only way to attract job candidates. Small- to medium-sized business owners don’t always need to advertise job openings because referrals through staff and their family and friends is easy and free. In this situation, employee can act as a screening tool to informally discuss how well the potential hire will fit into the culture and master their duties.

Prioritize Returning Seasonal Staff

Temporary employees who meet expectations should be encouraged to return the next season. This is ideal for people like teachers who are out of work or college students who are out of school during the summer break. Making these candidates the first choice will reduce the burden on HR staff and reduce the training burden on supervisors. This is why most HR professionals reach out to past successful temp employees to verify if they are available before the season starts.

Connect with Colleges

As mentioned above, hiring college students can be reliable and rewarding. Seasonal hiring through campus recruitment is possible through cultivating relationships with career offices, school administrators and community colleges. Career counselors will appreciate the resources because it makes their job easier. Many higher learning institutions maintain employment websites for employers to upload job ads and descriptions. College students who perform well and like the company may turn out to become full-time employees in the future.

Streamlining hiring processes and clarifying hiring policies will help with temporary talent management. Part two will cover interview structures, performance-based tests and employer branding.

How to Increase OSHA Compliance through Safety Programs – Part I

How to Increase OSHA Compliance – Part I Safety Programs | Allegiance

Posted by Sep 11, 2017 @ 9:30 am

OSHA is the main DOL program that ensures that employees enjoy safe and healthy workplaces. Certain industries are more heavily monitored and censured by OSHA, such as the agriculture, construction and manufacturing sectors.  Companies that must deal with potentially unsafe environments and hazardous tasks will need an OSHA-friendly safety program to maintain compliance and avoid liabilities.

Select a Safety Officer

Large companies can afford a full-time safety manager, but most small- to medium-sized companies will simply need a part-time safety officer or coordinator. Although a human resource or operations manager usually fills this role, having a team leader or experienced employee perform these duties is recommended because it demonstrates employee engagement and empowerment. A safety officer will be a primary contact for employees to get help, ask questions and report problems.

Employee Training

OSHA requires most industries to conduct annual training on common topics like blood borne pathogens and emergency action plans. Some of the most important safety and health training topics for general industry companies includes PPE, heat exposure, fall protection, occupational noise, lock out/tag out (LOTO) and hazard communication (HAZCOM). The best time for employee training is during orientation when the supervisor, safety officer and HR manager can build safety knowledge and enhance awareness of OSHA policies.

Create and Maintain JSAs or JHAs

OSHA states that a job hazard analysis is a technique to identify, document and prevent hazards before they occur. It includes the task, tools, employee, environment and required PPE. In order to be effective, JHAs must be continually updated anytime there are changes to these different elements. No warehouse or manufacturing facility can maintain safety without establishing concise guidelines that instruct employees how to exactly perform tasks. JHAs eliminate confusion and unsafe practices while helping to increase process conformity and quality standardization.

Hiring professional employees is an indirect way to increase a company’s safety culture and compliance. Part two will cover safety committees, investigations and inspection walk-throughs.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high
standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can
improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.
Workplace Safety During The Colder Months

Workplace Safety During The Colder Months | Allegiance

Posted by Sep 4, 2017 @ 9:30 am

Seasonal Safety Issues

There are certain workplace safety topics that are relevant all year. Other workplace safety issues are specific to the winter months. Climates vary, and some employers will have to address these workplace safety issues for large portions of the year.

Winter Workplace Safety In Different Industries

Winter workplace safety is something that all businesses have to think about, but it’s more of an issue in certain industries. Industries that involve outdoor labor and heavy driving will be strongly affected by the onset of winter.

However, even when employees work indoors exclusively, new safety hazards present themselves in the winter. Some employees will experience slip and fall accidents just as a result of walking into the workplace as a result of poorly managed icy conditions outside. Employees who take long commutes may be more likely to experience accidents as a result of the chaotic winter weather conditions.

There are also winter workplace hazards that are indirectly related to the season. For instance, employees are much more likely to get sick in the winter. If they come to work while sick, they can easily pass their contagious cold and flu symptoms to other employees, harming people and reducing the productivity of an entire department.

Addressing Workplace Safety

Employers can get rid of the ice in their parking lots in order to make them safer. They can help provide appropriate safety equipment for their employees in applicable situations. Employers cannot address seasonal workplace safety issues by ignoring them and pretending that work can always continue in the normal manner.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

4 Body Language Do's for Job Interviews

4 Body Language Do’s for Job Interviews | Allegiance

Posted by Aug 28, 2017 @ 9:30 am

When doing job interviews, it’s important that your body language conveys the message you want to convey. You want to give a great first impression of a confident and successful person. Here are some do’s when it comes to job interviews and body language.

Walk In and Out With Confidence

When you walk in, walk in confidently, smoothly and with a straight posture. Do the same when you go out. Greet people you meet, especially people who are in management and who will have a say in the hiring decision.

Shake Their Hand Firmly

Shake the hand of the person who is interviewing you. Giving a limp handshake will give off bad vibes. Give a firm and confident handshake. Don’t be too hard, though; you don’t want to crush their fingers.

Smile

Smile at people you meet and at the interviewer. It will make you more relaxed and will give off a favorable impression. Don’t have an overly serious facial expression, as you can come across as being in a bad mood or depressed. On the other hand, smiling too much can make you look foolish and not serious. It’s important that you find the right balance.

Lean In

While you should sit up straight in your chair and not slouch, it’s important that you lean slightly forward occasionally during your interview. This shows that you are attentive to what the interviewer is saying. Leaning in too much, though, isn’t a good idea either.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

Workplace Safety: Fall Hazards

Workplace Safety: Fall Hazards | Allegiance

Posted by Aug 21, 2017 @ 9:30 am

The time to address safety issues in your workplace is before an injury occurs. Every business, large and small, needs a documented workplace safety program. Make sure every employee reviews and understands the rules and hold regular safety meetings to go over safety procedures, including how to document and report workplace accidents.

One of the biggest safety hazards in all workplaces is fall hazards. Workplace falls can result in serious injury or death to your employees. It is reported by National Safety Council (NSC) that medical costs and workers compensation expenses associated with workplace slips and falls costs over $6 billion annually. You will also lose productivity in the workplace due to the absence of injured employees.  Here are some important tips to follow to prevent falls in your workplace:

  • Walkways – Make sure all walkways are dry and clear of debris. Do not use loose mats or rugs in areas of high traffic.
  • Footwear – Make sure all employees who work on wet floor surfaces wear slip-resistant footwear.
  • Floor Surfaces – Loose boards, tiling, or uneven or broken concrete surfaces must be repaired promptly.
  • Sign and Barricades – Barricade or section off sections of driveways or flooring in need of repair until the repair can be completed. This will prevent accidents from occurring to both employees and customers.
  • Covered Walkways – Provide covered walkways for employees to prevent them from slipping and falling in rain, snow, or icy conditions. 

Avoid accidents before they occur. Take some time now to implement a proper safety program for the employees of your small business and make sure they understand safety procedures and are provided with proper training. This will save you money in the long run on medical bills, fines, and lawsuits resulting from employee injury due to slip and falls or other workplace accidents.

Allegiance Staffing knows how important workplace safety compliance is. We provide a complete safety compliance analysis for your company. Our staff is experienced in OSHA regulations and stays on top of the latest in OSHA compliance laws and regulations.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.

Body Language Don'ts for Job Interviews

5 Body Language Don’ts for Job Interviews | Allegiance

Posted by Aug 14, 2017 @ 9:30 am

Body language plays an extremely important role in all job interviews. In many ways, it conveys more than the words you speak. Here are some job interview don’ts. Do not make these body language mistakes.

Don’t Slouch

Slouching or drooping your shoulders shows a lack of confidence. Instead, stand and sit up straight. Maintain good posture throughout the interview. This will give your interviewer a good impression of you.

Don’t Be Jumpy

Don’t fidget or move around too much. This conveys nervousness and not being able to concentrate. Don’t keep playing with your hair or pen or touching or rubbing your face and nose. Don’t keep shaking your leg.

Don’t Avoid Eye Contact

Avoiding eye contact and keeping your gaze away from the interviewer is never a good idea. Look at the interviewer and maintain a healthy eye contact. At the same time, another don’t is that you shouldn’t stare. Don’t stare into the interviewer’s eyes; it will make them uncomfortable about you. Alternate between making eye contact, looking at their face, and occasionally looking away.

Don’t Cross Your Arms or Legs

Crossing your arms can come across as defiant or defensive. It can also come across as overconfident, arrogant or aggressive. Instead, keep your arms to your side. It will be more comfortable for you as well. Don’t keep your hands in your pockets. Don’t cross your legs either.

Don’t Keep Nodding Your Head

You should nod your head periodically when listening to the interviewer speak, but don’t keep nodding your head the entire time. It will convey nervousness. It also shows a lack of self-confidence.

Allegiance Staffing offers 25 years of experience bringing in quality employees who meet high standards. Contact us today to learn more about how our custom labor solutions can improve your bottom line. Looking for work? Join Our Talent Network Today.