Take Extra Safety Precautions When Winter Weather Hits

By Allegiance Staffing
February 17, 2014

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Snow and ice storms have been rampant this winter, hitting parts of the United States that rarely see such weather conditions. Just look at what happened in Atlanta at the end the January when just a few inches of snow brought the city to a grinding halt and turned highways into parking lots of stranded motorists. 

It’s an excellent reminder that for all the emphasis we put on safety training on the job, we don’t want to neglect winter driving – even in areas like the Southeast that don’t normally deal with ice and snow. In fact, because drivers in those areas are less experienced dealing with winter conditions, they really can use extra training and tips. 

Whether you employ a team of drivers, operate forklifts or cranes on company property or simply need your employees to drive to work, it’s a great time for a refresher on being prepared should roads or parking lots turn slick.

Employers should monitor weather conditions carefully and, if possible, delay shift starts or office openings. The best safety option is keeping employees off the roads and at home. 

Here are a few other tips for safe winter driving; check AAA and the National Traffic Safety Institute for more info.

  • Make sure vehicles are in good working order with full tanks of gas and properly inflated tires. 
  • Drive slowly, leaving much more space between you and the cars in front of you than normal. 
  • Remember to accelerate and decelerate slowly as it takes more time to stop and go on slick roads. 
  • If you get stuck, tie a brightly colored cloth to your car and then stick with the car. Don’t try to brave the elements. 
  • Even if you’re only planning to drive a short distance, put an extra blanket and some food/water in your car just in case you get stranded. 

In these situations, the idea “better safe than sorry” is a good one to follow. Delaying your opening by a couple of hours isn’t worth possible collisions or putting employees in dangerous situations. 

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